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College Search

There’s always that crunch time between high school and anything else. There’s the excitement of graduation, the anguish of final exams, and that little voice in your head telling you that once school is over, chances are, you won’t be seeing your friends nearly each day anymore. And then, there’s the college search.

Parents are generally content to send you to college, but they’re never thrilled at the costs. Some parents are willing to pay for one thing, like books or tuition but not both; others will cover everything, or nothing. But always, no matter how much you’ve got in scholarships or whatnot, your bank account has to be able to hold its own. Once you have the money aspect figured out, the fun begins with the dreaded/anticipated choosing of the college.

There are plenty of college search engines just waiting for young students trying to design their futures. The Internet is full of details about what schools have the best cafeterias, or quirky statistics about the students enrolled (how much pop and junk food does your campus consume?). There are of course, the less fun details too, that are just as necessary, like average tuition fees, class lists and availability, text book prices and sales etc.

Normally, you should apply for multiple colleges, to assure that you get into at least one. Too many acceptances can be a wondrous thing. Think of choosing this over that, and knowing that whatever you chose will be what you get. The journey to college is a nice feeling. Try finding schools closer to you during your college search so that transportation is easier, depending on if you are living on campus or not. If not, then you’ll be doing more than just a college search, but one for apartments too, and that only works once you get accepted into a college first off...

Most students tend to doubt themselves or be influenced much too much when It comes to choosing classes. Think of it this way: if you know you love to cook, but aren’t sure if it could be a career for you, try it anyway. You’re young, even if you get put on a four year waiting list, those four years don’t have to be wasted. And if you do get in, learn lots, and then decide that it’s not for you, it can be a back-up.

What you major or minor in is your own choice. Throughout your entire college search, make sure that whatever you’re interested in is offered. There’s no point paying tuition if you’re doing something you don’t like. It’s your future, not your friends or family’s. Keep that in mind, and you’re sure to do alright.


 

 
   
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